Tag Archives: Pine Mountain

Elkhorn City Trail Town: The Pine Mountain Trail

This is the next post in the Elkhorn City Trail Town series today I want to talk about the Pine Mountain Traill.  If you want to read the first post in the series on the Blue Line Trail and Riverwalk click HERE.
The Pine Mountain Trail is open with contiguous trail from the Breaks Interstate Park to US 119 at Jenkins, Kentucky. It is designated in two sections for a total of 42 miles. When traveling from North to South you begin in Elkhorn City and travel the ridge to Jenkins.
The Birch Knob Section of the Pine Mountain Trail begins at the Russell Fork trailhead in the Breaks Park at Elkhorn City, Kentucky and follows the Pine Mountain ridge line 13 miles to Birch Knob, the highest point on this section of trail.  Water and primitive camping is available here with an overnight camp shelter.  Continuing southwest for 13 miles is the trailhead at US 23 at Pound Gap at Jenkins, Kentucky.
Brich Knob over view
Elkhorn City sets at the northern most end of the Pine Mountain Trail, the Pine Mountain Trail head is at Carson Island near the Blue Hole pay lake near the border to the Breaks Interstate Park. Numerous people have been enjoying using the trail head for the past four years. I myself have seen hikers from all over the United States near the trail head and in downtown Elkhorn City.
Brich Knob Elkhorn City Close up
The trail from the trail head into Elkhorn city is Carson Island Road to Patty Loveless drive and into downtown Elkhorn City. It’s at this point that the Pine Mountain Trail also intersects with the Trans-America Bike Trail and that the new Pike Energy Trail which is going to be the connector trail for the Great Eastern Trail leaving  Elkhorn city on its way across Pike County to Matewan West Virginia.
Here is a link to the Birch Knob Section of the Pine Mountain Trail.  PMT Birch Knob Section Map
Next in the Series will be the new Pike Energy Trail
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Endurance Athletes Converge on Breaks Interstate Park

Adventure Racing makes its debut in the area by testing racers over a grueling 15 hour course.

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Elkhorn City, KY. April 13, 2013: Racers from across the U.S. compete in a challenging event beginning at Breaks Interstate Park. Over the 15 hour course, racers will run, bike and paddle all while using a map and compass to find their way through some of the toughest terrain the area has to offer. To complete the event, athletes will push themselves over 65 very challenging miles.
The Breakdown Adventure Race is bringing a collection of extreme athletes to the area imposingly dubbed, “The Grand Canyon of the South”. Starting in the immense and spectacular gorge area of Breaks Interstate Park, along the Kentucky/Virginia border, racers will begin an adventure with miles of mountain-high biking, scenic backcountry, and clear, gorgeous waters. For some, the goal will be just to reach the finish line, while others will be competing to qualify for a spot at the USARA National Adventure Racing Championships.
As a never-before raced venue, the inaugural Breakdown will hopefully introduce racers to what the area has to offer, and will grow each year with some really exciting prospects on the horizon.
Shawn Lemaster, one of the Race Directors for 361°Adventures, is excited about bringing a race of this caliber to an area that’s actively embracing and searching for eco-tourism type of activities. “Growing up in Kentucky, I kind of took for granted how beautiful and rugged my home turf was, but revisiting Breaks Park was incredible. It’s one of those places that’s so scenic it seems misplaced – like you should have to travel somewhere on vacation just to see.”
Lemaster also commented on the unbelievable amount of cooperation from all the local agencies involved in making this a reality, “Across the board, we’ve received nothing but warm welcome and support. Breaks, Elkhorn City, Haysi, the folks at Pine Mountain Trail, the Army Corps of Engineers, the East Kentucky Trackers… you name it, they’ve all been on board and invaluable to making this a success.”
The action begins the weekend of April 13, 2013.

High Adventure on the Great Eastern Trail: Elkhorn City sees first Great Eastern Trail thru Hikers

This is a guest post by James “Fred” Stapleton about the Great Eastern Trail thru  Hikers that made it to Elkhorn City yesterday.  The Great Eastern Trail is going to be a great thing for Elkhorn … heres Fred!

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Another historic day has come and gone in Elkhorn City, KY. The world renowned “Hillbilly Bart and Someday Jo Show” arrived safe and sound at the northern terminus of the Pine Mountain State Scenic Trail section of the Great Eastern Trail on March 11, 2013. I must say this show was spectacular! Definitely the best show in town, any town!
In case you are wondering what the “Hillbilly Bart and Someday Jo Show” is all about. It’s all about the Great Eastern Trail (GET) and its first two thru-hikers, Joanna Swanson a.k.a. “Someday” from Minnesota and Bart Houck a.k.a. “Hillbilly Bart” from West Virginia.
Like truck drivers, long- distance hikers have a “trail handle”. Unlike truck drivers, long-distance hikers are on a much slower pace and they carry their cargo (25-45 lbs) on their backs. Bart and Jo began their epic journey in January on the southern end of the trail in Alabama and expect to be in New York’s Finger Lakes region sometime in May or June at the northern end.
The Great Eastern Trail (GET) is America’s newest long-distance hiking trail which is 1800 miles long and crosses nine states. Originally called the Western Appalachian Alternative, it was conceived by Earl Shaffer, the first Appalachian Trail thru-hiker. The Great Eastern Trail (GET) provides a premier hiking experience on a series of existing trails that are being linked to each other into a long-distance footpath in the Appalachian Mountains stretching from Alabama to the Finger Lakes Trail in New York.
Kentucky’s newest state park, the Pine Mountain State Scenic Trail is now officially part of the GET system and this is good news for Pike County. The Pine Mountain/Russell Fork River Corridor of Pike County Kentucky is quickly becoming an international destination for high-end eco-tourism activities. Undoubtedly, areas of Pike County such as Elkhorn City are poised to reap the benefits of this potential adventure recreation industry.
For example, in 1972 the Nantahala Outdoor Center (NOC) established an outdoor recreation company located at the intersection of the Appalachian Trail and the Nantahala River in rural Swain County, North Carolina, that has proven to be a shining success story. Originally a roadside inn, the company has evolved into one of the largest recreation companies in the nation and one of western Carolina’s largest employers. In 2010, NOC contributed $85,386,489 to the local economy while providing a total of 1,061 jobs. Another successful eco-tourism example is nearby Damascus, Virginia where 20,000 people hike into town for the annual “Trail Days” celebration.
I certainly think good things are on the horizon for communities that invest in eco-tourism but not all the benefits will be from financial gain, as I was privileged to witness Monday evening when I met “Hillbilly Bart” and “Someday” at the Pine Mountain Trailhead in Elkhorn City. This marked the beginning of “The Hillbilly Bart and Someday Jo Show” and I was fortunate enough to have the honor of rendezvousing with them at the Pine Mountain Trailhead and even more fortunate when they agreed to use my garage apartment, for a night of well deserved rest off the trail. “Someday” and “Hillbilly” were glad to get a solid roof over their heads (instead of nylon) and a hot shower. As for me, I was proud as a peacock to share my humble home with these celebrities. It was great to share their experiences over dinner at the Rusty Fork Café and again over my own, world famous oatmeal the following morning.
I’m not sure who receives the most enjoyment on this type of journey… the backpackers or local folks like myself, whom they meet along the way. When I met “Sometime” and “Hillbilly Bart” Monday evening I essentially became part of their journey. I became a team member and began to feel their excitement, their anticipation of what lies ahead, the dread of an approaching storm and the joy of finding out they have reached a safe campsite for the night.
This experience has made me think of the true advantages of living in a “trail town” or a “river town”. Throughout the ages humans have followed trails and rivers to advance trade… and trade advances prosperity and culture. So, just living near a river or a trail exposes us to new people, with new ideas that will enhance our knowledge and quality of life through diversity.
This exchange of humanity is equally experienced by our visitors hiking the trail as well. This is described by Debra Smith in her book, ”Great Stories of Hiking the Appalachian Trail”. She says “It might even be called a journey in human relationships and fantastic hospitality, with walking secondary. Folks we met along the way boosted our morale. Their faith in us, that we would achieve our goal and their help in making it possible could not have been greater. In this day of hate and violence it is refreshing to meet human beings who exemplify love for their fellowman.”
As Jo and Bart are approaching mile 700 on their 1,800 mile (4-5 month) trek from Alabama to New York on the newly developed Great Eastern Trail, I have no doubt they will arrive in New York with smiling faces, a few blisters and a pocket-full of Smarties. I’ve learned that Smarties and Moon Pies are like some-kind-of redneck Power Bar for thru-hikers. I would have never known!
If these folks stop in your town don’t miss the show. It’s certainly worth the price of admission…just for the nutritional info alone. Seriously, if you are fortunate enough to encounter these adventurers on their journey, offer your assistance and what you will receive in return will stick with you forever.
In conclusion, I am happy to report that I returned “Hillbilly Bart” and “Someday” to the trailhead where I found them this morning and they are now on their merry way to Matewan, West Virginia with great enthusiasm and spirit, along with “Hillbilly’s” bum ankle and “Someday’s” blistered foot. My advice…don’t bet against these guys. Personally, I’m betting the bank that the famous “Hillbilly Bart and Someday Jo Show” will be playing at a campsite somewhere in New York soon!!!
To join in the fun and follow the adventures of “Hillbilly Bart” and “Someday” on their way to New York visit their website at http://www.gethiking.net. Go, Go, Go Bart and Jo.

 

Submitted by James Stapleton
The author is a member of the Board of Directors of the Pine Mountain State Scenic Trail and currently living the dream in Elkhorn City, Kentucky.

You can find out more about the Great Eastern Trail Here

Follow Bart and Jo progress at www.gethiking.net

Elkhorn City Needs a Local Tourism and Convention Commission

Two Years ago today I wrote a post entitled 10 things Elkhorn City Must do to Thrive!  Now we are going to take a look at  each one of the 10 things individually and point out the specific steps that can be taken to accomplish each point.   (The good news is we have already accomplished items 3a 3b and 3c and the mayor is doing a great job with item 4.)

Number 1 on the list was “Establish a Local Tourism and Convention

Paddling the Meatgrinder

Paddling the Meatgrinder

Commission.”  The Southern and Eastern Kentucky Tourism Development Association has written an excellent document entitled “Tourism 101 Manual “ on how to establish a local tourism commission.  The first question is…

What is a Tourist Commission?   Let’s take a look at what the manual has to say.

“A tourist commission is a nonprofit organization formed to promote tourism in a community and is typically funded by a transient room tax also known as a “bed tax.” The funds collected for a tourist commission can be used only for the promotion of tourism. The tourist commission is governed by a board, which gets the community involved as well as the local government, because representatives from both must participate. A paid staff at the tourist commission promotes and develops tourism in the community. This staff typically produces brochures, attends travel shows, and promotes the community outside the region by following an organized marketing and advertising plan. As a result of this type of promotion, tourism properties in the area can expand, benefiting the local economy.”

The second question we should ask is, Why do we need one?  We need one for alot of reasons.  First and foremost, is having a local  body as a Tourism Commission enables a community to chart its  own course  in marketing itself and it tourism development.  Elkhorn City would not be dependent on Pikeville and Pike County’s Tourism Commission.  All the other reasons will be apparent as I go through the process of how Elkhorn City can establish a local tourism commission.

The Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS), specifically, KRS 91A.350(2) enables Elkhorn City can establish its’ own local tourist and convention commission for the purpose of promoting and developing convention and tourist activities and facilities.

Who is on the Tourist Commission?

In Kentucky KRS 91A.360  governs membership  of Tourist and Convention Commissions.

In Elkhorn City, a Tourist and Convention Commission members would be appointed by the mayor with at least 2 citizens form the local city hotel and motel association.  Elkhorn City does not have a hotel and motel association.  In this instance KRS 91A.360 states,  “If no formal local city or county hotel and motel association is in existence upon the establishment of a commission or upon the expiration of the term of a commissioner appointed pursuant to this subsection, then up to three (3) commissioners shall be appointed by the appropriate chief executive officer or officers from persons residing within the jurisdiction of the commission and representing local hotels or motels”

1 commissioner form the local restaurant association

“If no formal local restaurant association or associations exist upon the establishment of a commission or upon the expiration of the term of a commissioner appointed pursuant to this subsection, then one (1) commissioner shall be appointed by the appropriate chief executive officer or officers from persons residing within the jurisdiction of the commission and representing a local restaurant”

1 form the local  chamber of commerce

If no local chamber of commerce is in existence upon the establishment of a commission or upon the expiration of the term of a commissioner appointed pursuant to this subsection, then one (1) commissioner shall be appointed by the appropriate chief executive officer or officers from persons residing within the jurisdiction of the commission and representing local businesses”

(D) 2 commissioners by the mayor

KRS 91A.390 provides that the City can enact a Room Tax 3% and that  “(2) All moneys collected pursuant to this section and KRS 91A.400 shall be maintained in an account separate and unique from all other funds and revenues collected, and shall be considered tax revenue for the purposes of KRS 68.100 and KRS 92.330”

Elkhorn City can also enact a Restaurant tax through  KRS 91A.400  Restaurant tax in cities of the fourth and fifth class.

In addition to 3% room tax a 3% sales tax on … All moneys collected must be turned over to the Tourist and convention commission in the city as provided by KRS 91A.350 to 91A.390.

It would not hurt any of our current business by the imposing of the additional taxes.  Believe me we all pay them when we go to Pikeville to eat out or most any other town in Kentucky.  It does not make sense for the businesses to complain about the extra taxes since all the money goes back into market and promoting Elkhorn City which then brings in more business.

Here are some helpful links for planning and help in this area:

Tourism 101 Manuel

Elkhorn City Economic Development and Tourism Planning Resources

https://timbelcher.wordpress.com/2011/09/29/economic-development-planning-sources-for-elkhorn-city/

Elkhorn City’s YourTown Workshop Results

This post is a section of The Elkhorn City Area Heritage Council’s Final Report for our December 2011 YourTown followup workshop authored by Steve Ruth and other Heritage C ouncil members.  

“The two day workshop kicked off Thursday, December 1, with introductions from ECAHC President Tim Belcher. Stephanie Richards and Steve Ruth followed with details about the ACT and Russell Fork whitewater, including history, achievements and future goals. These presentations were well received and enthusiastically endorsed by the presenters for Barter Theater (Duehring) and Canoe Kentucky (Depenbrock).

Both visiting entities identified and requested local partnership opportunities which was worth the effort in itself. Barter’s resident playwrite will collaborate with ACT and Canoe Kentucky offered material support (canoes/kayaks, accessories) to ECAHC to promote on-stream activities.

John Michael Johnson wrapped up the presentations with an overview of the new US460 project which will be completed and bring 4 lane access to Elkhorn City within 4-5 years. This presents new opportunities to Elkhorn City to establish business districts, expand city limits, and offer more tour-bus based offerings.

After a lunch break, participants broke into two groups for the walking tour/inventory exercise while workshop coordinators moved the show to the Elkhorn City library’s meeting room. Participants finished the day by reporting on the walking tour, identifying primary assets and needs in the downtown area.

Day two was kicked off with presentations from Russ Clark, NPS RTCA, on the economic benefits of blueways and Seth Wheat, Kentucky Adventure Tourism, on the state’s new Trail Town initiative.

The remaining day two group split into sub groups, one arts focused, one adventure tourism focused, to further discuss assets/needs and to begin the process of identifying the 10 actions the city should take to move forward.

Each partipant was then asked to vote on specific suggestions with a series of weighted votes (top 3 priorities) to winnow down the long list of actions. Upon identifying the top 10, by vote, actions, we discussed and finalized the list by consensus.

Results
The workshop produced a number of immediate accomplishments. Partnerships were formed between Barter Theater and ACT and between Kentucky Canoe and ECAHC. These actions were a direct result of interactions in the workshop. Also, a local entrepreneur, at this time, is negotiating a franchise agreement with Canoe Kentucky to open a small canoe livery in Elkhorn City.

A needs inventory was identified with the following wish list:
• Walking bridge rehab
• In-town lodging
• Improved signage (both in town and leading to town)
• Outdoor outfitter store
• Public restroom

A list of action items were identified:
1. A full time tourism/development driver who acts as a Tourism Director/Grant Writer/Business Recruiter
2. Development/Completion of Whitewater Park
3. Pedestrian bridge/walkway repair/rebuild
4. Community Center/Tourism Office/Public Restroom facility (Depot/Railroad museum)
5. Kentucky Trail Town Designation (through office of Adventure Tourism)
6. Better signage leading to town and in town attractions
7. Lodging (B&B, Motel, campgrounds, cabins)
8. Outdoor outfitter/in town canoe/kayak/innertube livery
9. Arts/cultural center/galleries/shops

Since the workshop, there have been several developments that can lead to further progress in Elkhorn City’s master tourism goals.
• Kentucky Trail Town designation in progress
• Awarding of Coal Severance funds in state budget for design and permitting of water park
• Commitment of local businessman to build lodging facility downtown
• Identification and right of way negotiation for Great Eastern Trail from Elkhorn City through Pike County to Matewan, WV.
• New restaurant and new laundromat in downtown area.
• A new partnership with Eastern Kentucky University, University of Kentucky, and Kentuckians for the Commonwealth’s “After Coal Economic Initiative”.

The design/final document from the follow-up workshop is still under development and should be completed and distributed by July, 2012. This document will include results of the workshop combined with previous design/development documents for Elkhorn City Arts and Tourism goals. This document will be shared among workshop participants and interested parties. It will be the blueprint for the afore-mentioned partnership with EKU, UK, and KFTC.”

Here is a link to the complete document with Pictures!!!!!